“get paid to review products on amazon +how to receive free amazon products for reviews”

I only write honest reviews, and I write them as if I spent my own money to buy the product (just as customers would.) I test all products thoroughly. I also only do reviews for products that interest me. That being said, most times I don’t get awful products because I research the product on Amazon before I say ‘yes.’ If it looks like junk, or other reviewers are panning it, then I say ‘no, thanks.’

In other words: Unless you have a way to confirm with the person (or company) writing the review, or you are Amazon, it’s all conjecture. Keep in mind that these analyses are based on Fakespot’s techniques, so we have to take their word for it. We don’t have a way to verify how precise they are. However, you can make educated guesses. And if you’re in a hurry or in need of a second opinion, Fakespot can be a useful tool when you’re considering a purchase.

Amazon is incredibly data driven and document heavy. Although those are not inherently bad things and can be good, they often keep the organization from seeing the big picture and balancing strategy with short-term numbers and reactions.

Hi I am a manufacturer how/where do i get a list of specific UK Amazon reviewers in order to send them specific products they would normally review? I am not sure where I get the Amazon reviewers details from in order to make contact with them?

Like a few other review sites mentioned here, VIP Power Club will notify you when deals are available instead of crawling through their database and applying for products. Most offers are between 90% and 100% off and you can expect to pay no more than $5 for most items.

One major piece of information that Amazon does not share is how often it invites users to the Vine program, so it’s never really clear if Amazon is actively recruiting new reviewers. So if you want to be considered, you’ll simply have to keep at it. Most anecdotes found online of Vine members being invited are somewhat dated at this point.

Hi Megan,Very interesting article. I have only had time to peruse it, I will digest it later when time permits. However,my problem is how to get that first virgin Amazon review. I purchased hard copies of my book, handed someout and mailed others. One recipient tried to write a review on Amazon, but was politely told he didn’t buy thebook from them, so they wouldn’t accept his review.I have written to a few reviewers, but didn’t get a reply.How do I get off the mark?Sincerely yours Michael Conlan  

I have had a couple companies send me an Amazon gift card that I used to purchase their product. Same benefits as above, with the exception of the first benefit: the reviewer can only use it for your product. They could use it for anything on Amazon since it is just like cash. That would be unethical, but possible.

The comments are interesting but most are incorrect if they believe that all discounted reviews are shill. I just received a request from an Amazon partner to do discounted item (for my honest revie). I though,t well if they think they are buying stars from me they are very wrong. I have no incentive to give bad or good reviews artificially. I don’t get anything extra. So people that paint a negative brush are quite wrong. It matters more to me to be honest because I buy items there at full price and don’t want to be fooled. Think about this too. Send it back. It’s easy as that. It’s a pain, but the situation isn’t all fake.. Common sense tells you that Amazon would nosedive.if this was the case.

Thanks for the suggestion. I don’t know anything about them since they are new to me, BUT I will say that their site does not use encryption during the sign-up, login process and account area. I HIGHLY recommend you hold off using the site until they fix this security issue. I will be contacting RMI telling them they need to fix this to protect their users/customers. Thanks again for bringing this to my attention.

Another problem with Amazon’s review system is that they often link together similar yet different products, so that multiple versions of a product show all the same reviews. For instance, blu-ray and DVD editions of a movie are often linked together, so you’ll see reviews for the blu-ray and reviews for the DVD lumped together in the same list. There was once a computer model that had different versions with notable differences (one with an Intel processor, and one with an AMD processor, for instance), and reviews for both models were lumped together in the same list. People were commenting on the reviews saying “This PC doesn’t have an AMD processor, it has an Intel processor, you reviewed the wrong product!” – When in fact it was Amazon’s review grouping, rather than the reviewer’s mistake.

For Eric, Feedback Genius was a “no-brainer purchase.” For just 20 dollars a month, he gets all of his buyer communications automated with personable messages to customize each customer’s purchasing experience.

I’ve left hundreds of reviews for free or discounted products. All are honest, and most are extremely thorough. No politician is watching my back, and it is because of that fact that I boldly tell people what I think. The funny thing is that for me, the bias tends to go in the opposite direction. I am so used to getting things for free or heavily discounted, that when I look at the full prices I nearly always think they’re asking too much and that the product isn’t worth that. I’ve had to make it a habit to comparison shop for items I review so that I have some realistic idea of how much that type of item costs and don’t give low star ratings for something based on my unrealistic expectations. I do consider the full selling price, because I only review items I’m interested in buying or using even if I were paying full price. Just because your reaction would be to like something better because it is free doesn’t mean everyone’s is. I’m more likely to think it’s junk, because if it isn’t, why would it be free? I’m always thrilled to write a five-star review, because I almost never expect that I’ll get to do it.

You’re suggesting that the big companies such Lego, Otterbox, Disney and others have a monopoly. You’re not giving the little guy a chance… These websites are helping small businesses. Get yourself together and think outside of the box.

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