“how do i review products for amazon -amazon product reviews free”

Hi Boris,No, it’s not the same. In the VINE program Amazon sends advanced product samples (before the product actually becomes available for sale on their site) to it’s top reviewrs. The reviews they leave are not counted as “verified purchases”, and thus they do not artificially inflate the product’s sales data, like your suggested method will. Many new merchants are using coupon codes to give away products for review, and most are getting away with it at the moment. It’s a big risk in my opinion, as it’s only a matter of time before Amazon says, “enough is enough”, and then clamps down on the practice (and possibly penalizes merchants who have done it in the past too). If you are planning on building a solid, long term sustainable business on Amazon, I’d advise against engaging in any practices that are not clearly acceptable. Stay healthy and stay out of the grey zone my friend! It’s not worth the risks! 🙂  

Thanks for the tips. I’ve actually been using personal information that’s close to mine so easy to remember but not really me. Real address though; haven’t figured out a convenient way around that one.

I’ve been successful in more than a few cases sending a nice email to some top reviewers, and in those instances received not only favorable reviews, but gained a fan for my books and a good network connection. I think it’s important to build relationships like that.

Even if you don’t manage your feedback in FeedbackFive, you can still sign up for an account to track product reviews. If you do that, you will have access to the “My Product Reviews” interface and will be able to see other pages, but we won’t import orders or send emails on your behalf. If you’re a FeedbackFive user already, “My Product Reviews” will appear in your dashboard’s sidebar. You can track two ASINs for free, or you can sign up for this enhancement to your account, which starts at $9.95 per month.

Since Amazon has basically outlawed the free-product-for-a-review practice, I actually found a different way to make product reviews work. On my site I did some research about the off-Amazon reviews I’ve done and how the product’s sales have increased as a result.

As mentioned in that post you are referring to, there are also a few other shoe companies, like Nike, that have product testing that US residents can participate in. Have you tried signing up for any of those?

Didn’t link to the FS analysis because I hadn’t checked it out myself, and any interested reader could find it on their own as easily as you or I. Nor did I link to the product because I had no intention of shilling it here. But if you’d like to check it out for yourself: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N6DC2ZE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Again, dunno how it compares to the Anker reviewed here earlier, they both have the the same specs regarding battery life and such. Seems like ones I bought might be less bulky/lighter, not sure.

Now this is certain a strange product. It’s just a pen, but it’s bizarrely advertised towards women. Bic’s product description reds: “A beautifully smooth ball pen designed specifically for women. The pink barrel has a great floral design that continues onto the metal cone. Super smooth Easy Glide ink & a cushioned grip make writing with this pen ultra comfortable!”

This is the online guerrilla marketing method of PR. There is a unique benefit of getting product reviews from other websites that helps increase brand credibility and trustworthiness in addition to word-of-mouth marketing.

Hi Tristan. Great information! I just wanted to underscore a sentence you wrote above regarding receiving payment post-review (I work in an industry where the payment based upon success of the product is frowned upon/illegal/immoral as well). As you point out, this is so important: “It’s payment for review (a gray area, or flat out forbidding), and open for being taken advantage of by the person requesting the review.” Again, great article and advice within the comment section. BTW, No, Tristan did not pay me for this comment!

This is not a review site in the traditional sense, but an email subscription for a retail store in NYC that also has an Amazon store and needs reviewers for their Amazon products. Available for reviewers in USA.

The only sites that I know of that give free kids stuff are the ones that giveaway baby stuff like diapers. I have heard of people who contact toy companies directly and were able to get free toys for their kids to “test”. Other than that, I don’t know of any. I’ll update this page if find any.

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