“receive free products for review amazon -how to get free products from amazon for review”

Recently I wrote a book on WordPress themes, and needed to get people to review it on Amazon (not many people are interested in buying a book/product when there are no reviews.) I looked at the reviewers of other WordPress books to reach out to them to see if they would like to review my book as well. Problem was that almost no one’s Amazon profile helped me find their email so I could contact them.

The active way would be to come right out and say that you enjoy reviewing products on Amazon. While there is no hard and fast rule against you saying that you would take products in exchange for honest reviews, I would advise against it. Since Amazon has the Vine Program in place, I’m not sure how kindly they would take to you overtly circumventing the program on your profile. It’s not that Amazon doesn’t know people are sent items for free in exchange for reviews, but I am sure they would prefer you not advertise you do so outside of Vine. But, if you are super eager to be sent products to review, then maybe the active approach might be best for you.

What I do care about re:reviews is that while you may be as good as gold, there is an unfortunate connotation that if someone gets something for free that there might be a tendency to review less harshly. When it’s your money on the line you get more annoyed if something isn’t up to snuff. That’s a tendency.

No. Writing a negative review will not impact a Voice’s reviewer ranking. A reviewer’s ranking is determined by the number of helpful votes from other customers. Customers tend to value substantive, informative, detailed and objective reviews, regardless of whether the review is positive, negative, or neutral.

This is especially bad for books. If you are looking to choose an edition of a book that’s in the public domain, all the reviews for every edition are grouped together. Often, I want to know if a book’s font is large enough, if a book is sturdy, etc. Also, with these books, the Look Inside feature shows just one edition which may not be the one you’re interested in.

I’m inclined to agree with you. Fakespot gave the Amazon page below an “A”, but all 17 reviews are “Verified purchases” by common named people giving generic praise and all but one have 5 stars – most are written within weeks of each other. Now, this product may very well be that good, but doesn’t any of that strike someone as pretty suspicious?

As Product Elf has grown in popularity so quickly, they have over 40,000 reviewers, discount codes can disappear quickly. New offers are uploaded on a daily basis as sellers are launching new products all the time.

It’s really helpful as it catches almost all mistakes that I might make. Nothing huge, but just little “hte,” instead of “the,” etc. I include that one because it sends me a report every Sunday that goes over improvements I might work on and a listing of my most corrected words. That one shows up a lot :). Just being careless…

Be aware that Amazon is cracking down on these things! We have had several customers who have left reviews that Amazon either chose not to post or pulled down after they were posted. We are talking about verified purchases too! After contacting Amazon, they could not give any real solid answers as to why, and that the customer should contact them directly. They are really difficult to work with as a seller!

At the same time, one of our readers, Tracy, who had commented a while back about the site, joined the site and came back to share her experience. And her experience is basically aligned with my thoughts. See Tracy’s comment here.

Great article! I’d like to add that in addition to asking shoppers to share their own product reviews on the site, store owners can also be proactive and collect reviews off-site from social media. As you already mentioned, Instagram is full of great content that can be used as social proof. The same applies to YouTube and user-generated video reviews. The more diverse and visually-rich format you use for customer reviews, the better.

I hate all the Vine reviews. That’s great, you got something for nothing, good for you. But don’t expect me to believe your opinion is anywhere near as objective as someone who actually paid good money for the product they’re reviewing. Just look and see how many of the four and five star reviews are from Vine hucksters.

Thank you for this list. I’m with bad agent,pinch me AMD influenster. I’m getting my first campaign with buzz agent I’ll be getting a glade candle. Influsenter let me get a Vick’s humidifier and a Travis silly cup. And pinch me is letting my try some scrub pads, and engaging toddler milk. I will be checking out the other websites u mention too. Thank u!

This site launched at the end of July 2016. They show a handful of sample products on their home page: costumes, toys, beauty supplies, electronics, speakers, phone cases, apparel, video camera, and more. Available for reviewers in the UK.

Savvy shoppers almost never purchase a product without knowing how it’s going to work for them. They read the good, the not-so-good, and the downright ugly to make the all-important decision: should I pull out my wallet and take the plunge?

By the way, I would disagree with the “Vipon is dead” posted above. It’s not like it used to be but I still get a few products there. I’ve got 10-12 from them over the past month. Their site is down this weekend while they move to new servers and update the site.

Scott, I am not sure about Product Testing USA. To me it doesn’t look like a real product testing site. I get the feeling it is more of a “feel out a survey for us and you may be chosen to test a product” kind of site. So, if you are looking for real product testing, stick with the sites mentioned in this post, or other legit companies. Hope that helps.

Many Amazon sellers have been concerned about the future of feedback solicitation since Amazon.com, Inc. (“Amazon”) began allowing buyers to opt out of non-critical communication from merchants. Some have started thinking things like Is feedback solicitation really worth it? and Is this even allowed by Amazon?

I’m glad you found it insightful! As for bad reviews, that can be tough for some reviewers to write. Companies will often write “we are a small family business” in their emails to you. Some of these are true, and I believe others are saying it trying to coax you into feeling awful if you write a bad review.

To get some perspective, we spoke with Bing Liu, a professor in the department of computer science at the University of Illinois at Chicago, whose focuses include sentiment analysis, opinion mining, and lifelong machine learning. He has written textbooks on the subjects. We wanted to know his opinion on whether it is possible for a program or group of programs to evaluate reviews and correctly determine their validity. Liu’s thoughts:

> The Vine program, and similar methods of eliciting feedback, give away products for free (or sell them at a deep discount) to potential customers vetted (by Amazon in the case of the Vine program) for the helpfulness of their reviews, in exchange for an “honest review.”

The required registration is easy. Get to their website and scroll all the way down until you find a place to fill in your e-mail address and click join. Promotion codes will be sent via e-mail and your prize for your review is free OZ Naturals product. Update: This site no longer offer 100% free products in exchange for reviews, instead you get heavily discounted products. You can get (full-size) products for  $1.95. Thanks to Ann for the update.

So, they make it appear that if I refer a seller that signs up with them, then I will will receive all of the sellers (who will likely be highly incentivized with highly discounted first month in fees) “platform” (fees seller pays for privilege of listing their free/discounted products) during their first month. And if that isn’t enough to get me racing to email box to frantically contact my sellers, then perhaps mention of, “And” I will also get more product to will motivate me. Of course any increase in products to review (free or discounted) would be a direct result of sellers (that I refer ) signing up and listing their products.

The Echo is a good listener. Hidden within are seven noise-cancelling microphones that use “far-field” voice recognition technology. All that really means is that it’s good at hearing you even when you aren’t next to it, and even when there’s other chatter going on. In my home, the Echo can understand me just fine from several feet away, even when I’ve got the TV on. And, if you’ve got more than one Echo device in your home, only the one nearest to you should respond.

However, I like writing honest reviews and reviews that actually help people, even if they don’t receive votes for it. I’ve seen some Vine reviewers who were honest, but the majority are not, imo. I’ve seen positive Vine reviews for products where all the non-Vine reviews were poor. So while I’d love to be a Vine member, I don’t think I’m dishonest enough for it.

Nice article. I don’t mean to sound negative, but I have been on most of the panels that you have suggested and the only one that ever has truly panned out for me is productreport.com. They definitely do send products for you to test. I once got $150.00 for just answering moderator questions for 4 days. They have slowed down now and its been hard to get the required 25.00. Most of the other places rarely send out anything worthwhile. The Nielsen company I scanned for over 2 years faithfully almost 3 times a week and finally was able to “cash out” with a pair of iphone headphones. What a joke. I hope others are more successful than I have been on these places!

I am signed up with a few different places. Loreal is good. you get a nice gift bag with full size products worth over $100. I go to their Clark,NJ location. also CRL in Piscataway,NJ. good studies there too. Coty in Morris Plains,NJ. doing two now. will get paid $100 for one and $30 for the other next week in cash. not bad. Revlon in Edison NJ too.

the reviewers who get the product at a discount or for free have to say that in the review so just look at teh review and see if it is a discounted purchase if you don’t like them but no one is paid for a review. Amazon doesn’t allow anyone to pay for a review all they can do is either give a product for free or at a reduced price.

Rather than focus on quantity of reviews, they are focused on quality. It’s no good if you’re out there on Amazon leaving one-word reviews left and right. Being a prolific reviewer is no guarantee of joining the Vine program. Amazon’s guidelines for a Vine Voice are:

We use these various revenue streams not only to support our staff, but also to purchase products for review, to outfit our offices with the best tools and equipment for testing – including the construction of our new 5,000-square-foot Purch Lab – and to continue to expand the number of products and services we rank and review.

While Vine members used to receive a monthly newsletter featuring books and other products they chose from to review — with products valued at anywhere from a few dollars to close to $1,000 — they now have access to a rolling list of items they can order at any time. According to NPR, Vine members cannot sell or give items received through the program away and Amazon can ask for the items back — although they don’t appear to do that.

Hi ive just written my book called Goodness and Mercy under Frederick Amina at Amazon book’s. If anyone is looking for a good read this is the book to read. This is the book it’s about alcoholism divorce drug addiction bitterness anger hatred and jealousy forgiveness unforgiveness anxiety poverty fear worry love happiness death suicide lost of a loved one Redemption and so much more all in one book. Thanks

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